Creative Challenge in Brazil

Brasil Yawanawá explains work at the original Yawanawá settlement of Escondido.

Brasil Yawanawá explains work at the original Yawanawá settlement of Escondido.

In December 2014 Uwe Derksen,  head of the Enterprise Team at UCA,  visited the Amazon in Brazil, invited by the Yawanawa tribe, whose member Nixiwaka (also known as Joel) works for Survival International, the movement for tribal peoples and has been involved in the Creative Challenge for the last couple of years.

The aim of the visit was to seek information and answers to a range of questions, which could  be shared with UCA students. There was also the possibility of developing the project further, depending on the outcome.

The Yawanawá tribe people are one of many indigenous people of Brazil. They, that are a few hundred of Yawanawá people, live in small villages or settlements along the narrow Gregorio river. In order to reach the various Yawanawá villages it is necessary to travel from Tarauacá by truck on the BR-364 for 1.5 hours to the river Gregorio where at the Ponte Sobre there is an access point to the river with a number of small commercial outlets. From there using a small narrow light-weight aluminum canoe boat with an air-cooled long-tail outboard motor it takes about 4-5 hours to reach the first Yawanawá village and another 4-5 hours to reach the last settlement, which is about 80 km away. The Gregorio river is relatively narrow, depending on water levels and extremely windy whilst littered with tree branches and stumps. The river has become more hazardous due to a major recent flooding (November 2014), bringing down riverside trees as well as destroying some houses and equipment of indigenous and non-indigenous people living alongside the river. The flood apparently was the worst ever and illegal tree logging is being blamed as one of the causes.

Uwe said,

I experienced the people them as welcoming, warm and friendly, hard working and giving, humorous and helpful, trusting. My deep respect and thanks go to all those people (Yawanawá and others) who opened their doors to me as a stranger in their home. It was privileged to be among them, albeit briefly.

Flooding at Yawanawa tribe

Floodwater-ravaged banks at Yawanawa tribal territory

Uwe has written some blog entries about his experiences at  http://mistakesandcontradictions.blogspot.co.uk.

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ESADHaR and UCA join forces to design exhibition space

In November, five Fine Art students from ESADHaR worked with Level 2 Interior Architecture students for the initial stage of designing an exhibition space for the Despite Efficiency: Labour exhibition at the Herbert Read Gallery.  Here are some images of the process:

Interior Architecture and Design students address inefficiency in the workplace

from the UCA newsdesk….

Images from the Despite Efficiency: Labour exhibition in the Herbert Read Gallery, UCA Canterbury

Image from the Despite Efficiency: Labour exhibition in the Herbert Read Gallery, UCA Canterbury

Interior Architecture & Design students from the University for the Creative Arts (UCA) have developed an ambitious exhibition with multidisciplinary studio Aberrant Architecture that challenges the efficiency of workplaces.

Currently on display in UCA Canterbury’s Herbert Read Gallery, Despite Efficiency: Labour is a participative exhibition thatlooks at the practical consequences and critical value of inefficiency in the context of work. Upon arrival, visitors are invited to sit underneath a 1.5 metre suspended ceiling on a desk chair in an area flooded with artificial light.

“Inefficiency can be understood as an effort without reward; as the negative result of a system designed to be profitable,” explained Emma Braso, UCA’s Cultural Programme Curator. “The project creates a working space where these ideas can be played out in different formats and shapes, independent of their utility.”

Openings in the grid ceiling also allow visits to stand up and enjoy a series of different micro-environments, which are naturally lit. A number of narrative panels, each individually designed by participating students and able to be viewed through binoculars placed by each opening, explore the history of office design.

The gallery is hosting a number of live performances, videos and projects as part of the exhibition, all presented by a group of international artists and related to situations and models of unprofitable, futile or ineffective work.

This project was supported by Recreate and ICR, two initiatives selected under the European Cross-border Cooperation Programme Interreg IV A France (Channel) – England, co-funded by the European Regional Development Fund.

View over the top of the suspended ceiling - natural light

View over the top of the suspended ceiling – natural light

View of office desk with seats below suspended ceiling and video playing

View of office desk with seats below suspended ceiling and video playing

View of visitors on seats underneath the suspended ceiling

View of visitors on seats underneath the suspended ceiling

 

For more information about Despite Efficiency: Labour, please visithttp://www.ucreative.ac.uk/galleries/herbert-read.

 

ICR was selected under the European Cross-border Cooperation Programme INTERREG IVA France (Channel) – England, co-funded by the ERDF

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