Medway Photo Festival: student exhibits

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UCA photography students takeover Medway

from the UCA newsdesk…..

Kate Morrison exhibits at Medway Photo Festival

Kate Morrison exhibits at Medway Photo Festival

Budding photographers from the University for the Creative Arts (UCA) exhibited at three sites across Chatham as part of the annual Medway Photo Festival. Students from BA (Hons) Photography and MA Photography at UCA Rochester had the opportunity to showcase their work at the Festival, which is now in it’s 7th year.

The festival, which took place between January 14 – 18, gave students from BA (Hons) Photography and MA Photography at UCA Rochester the opportunity to showcase their latest works.

Now in its seventh year, the festival featured five shows – Enigma, Envision, Ipseity, Within the Shadow, and Work in Progress – spread across Chatham’s Pop Creative Space, Sun Pier House, and Nucleus Arts Gallery.

Pop Creative Space on Chatham High Street hosted Enigma and Within the Shadow, which looked at the subjects of social documentary, and existence respectively.

Amongst the exhibitors at Pop were Luna Limbu, who portraits ex-Gurka soldiers, and Hannah Vigors, whose work “The Horse” examines the anatomical movement of horses.

Sun Pier House on Medway Street, Chatham,  exhibited the undergraduate show Ipseity and the postgraduate show MA: Work in Progress. Exploring the concept of identity, Ipseity featured the work of six photographers including Kate Morrison, whose series Our Normal looks at people who have modified their bodies with tattoos and piercings.

The final show, Envision, took place at the Nucleus Arts Gallery on Chatham High Street and looked at various mental states within society. Exhibitors included Catherine Stuart, whose work “The Lure of the Lighted Window” took a disorientating look at shopping addiction and consumption, and Charlotte Rose Edwards, whose series “My Mind is a Horror Story ” explored how mental illness is glamourised by the fashion industry and teen culture.

The Medway Photo Festival is supported by the Recreate project, which helps the development of the creative industries in specific regions of the UK and France.  Recreate was selected under the European Cross-border Cooperation Programme INTERREG IV A France (Channel) – England, co-funded by the European Regional Development Fund.

UCA Rochester has a strong history of graduating talented photographers, with recent alumni Adam King’s latest work Chip off the Old Block currently featured on the influence Photomonitor.co.uk.

For further information about the festival, please visit medwayphoto.co.uk.

A contemporary reading room

Inspired by Margate’s Georgian reading rooms and as part of an overall debate on the role of interior architecture on urban renewal, students on the Interior Architecture and Design (BA) Hons course worked with lecturers to design a modular reading room for the modern day.

Traditionally, reading rooms were a cross between a library, a museum of curiosities, and a place for games and gossip so students built into the reading room their own modules, places for reading, writing, playing games and chatting.

Initially installed at the old Pettman’s Depository, Resort Studios, Margate in November 2013 to host a week-long series of events and talks. During the summer of 2014, the Reading Room continued its legacy travelling to the Folkestone Triennial where it was housed at the Visitor Centre acting as a place for public forums as well as an information point for festival visitors. For more images go here.

Crysalis’ achievements

A strong fabric built over three years’ intense collaboration

The three-year Crysalis project is almost complete, and we are celebrating its many successes and its legacy. Industrial partners and entrepreneurs, students, designers, researchers and artists have been working across borders and have set up a new, strong network all about textiles.

We’ve created lots of opportunities; for knowledge transfer, which allowed textile professionals, as well as enthusiastic amateurs, to be inspired with new ideas and the necessary courage to leave the beaten paths. For creativity as a priority, too: experimental and creative session resulted time and time again in beautiful, smart or innovative textile products, which will perhaps appear commercially in the near future.

There were several exhibitions where the public was given a glimpse of a new future for textiles. In the UK, France and Belgium, we exceeded our visitor number expectations, attracting 63,183 visitors, illustrated in our interaction per activities reach map image (below left)

Interaction per activity

Interaction per activity

Besides the added value of Crysalis activities for the individual participants, there were opportunities created to continue the new collaborations and projects. Meetings between enthusiastic and expert people produced synergies that will, we believe, have promising results.

The collaborative weave we have been working on together is strong, but it isn’t finished yet. We want to explore the possibility of continuing to strengthen local textile techniques, for instance, by teaching skills and stimulating knowledge-sharing between European partners. Find out more about the interactions fostered by Crysalis in these three years of work in our interaction per region reach map at the foot of this page.

Of course, textile innovation is necessary to move forward, so we want to continue offering creative people like artists and designers opportunities to develop new applications. One way we are thinking of doing this is through making working areas more accessible via our edge services. More information at www.ucaedge.com

 

More information: Susiane at ssampaio@ucreative.ac.uk

 

 

 

 

 

Crysalis activity by region

Crysalis activity by region

Read all about it!

Hot off the press!

To capture the many projects that have taken place over the last year through Recreate funding we have created a publication series – hot off the press!

A set of five publications showcases a mix of student and staff-led collaborative projects that engage with the Recreate agenda of culture-led regeneration strategies:

  • Transforming Spaces edited by Peter Waters;
  • Reading Rooms edited by Lara Rettondini;
  • Syn City edited by Gabor Stark;
  • Ephemeral Spaces edited by JJ Brophy and
  • Folkestone Centipede edited by Terry Perk and Julian Rowe.

A further three publications will complete the series later this year.

If you would like a copy, please contact Amie Rai: arai2@ucreative.ac.uk.

Jessica van Twuiver, studying Fashion Promotion and Imaging, said “My project developed from holiday in Greece. In Zakynthos I went to the ship wreck bay: the island is a true paradise but it has a dark side; the effects of mass tourism. I saw stray animals, abandoned buildings and I linked this with how I feel about the fashion industry. There is a dark side; there is waste, the cruelty of the fur industry and horrible conditions of the people who make clothes. My project is to establish an eco-friendly luxury range of fashion lingerie; against animal cruelty, pro-fair wages, locally produced using low impact fabrics and materials. I believe if we can each make a little difference and start to inspire others, then together we can make a big difference.”