Creative Challenge in Brazil

Brasil Yawanawá explains work at the original Yawanawá settlement of Escondido.

Brasil Yawanawá explains work at the original Yawanawá settlement of Escondido.

In December 2014 Uwe Derksen,  head of the Enterprise Team at UCA,  visited the Amazon in Brazil, invited by the Yawanawa tribe, whose member Nixiwaka (also known as Joel) works for Survival International, the movement for tribal peoples and has been involved in the Creative Challenge for the last couple of years.

The aim of the visit was to seek information and answers to a range of questions, which could  be shared with UCA students. There was also the possibility of developing the project further, depending on the outcome.

The Yawanawá tribe people are one of many indigenous people of Brazil. They, that are a few hundred of Yawanawá people, live in small villages or settlements along the narrow Gregorio river. In order to reach the various Yawanawá villages it is necessary to travel from Tarauacá by truck on the BR-364 for 1.5 hours to the river Gregorio where at the Ponte Sobre there is an access point to the river with a number of small commercial outlets. From there using a small narrow light-weight aluminum canoe boat with an air-cooled long-tail outboard motor it takes about 4-5 hours to reach the first Yawanawá village and another 4-5 hours to reach the last settlement, which is about 80 km away. The Gregorio river is relatively narrow, depending on water levels and extremely windy whilst littered with tree branches and stumps. The river has become more hazardous due to a major recent flooding (November 2014), bringing down riverside trees as well as destroying some houses and equipment of indigenous and non-indigenous people living alongside the river. The flood apparently was the worst ever and illegal tree logging is being blamed as one of the causes.

Uwe said,

I experienced the people them as welcoming, warm and friendly, hard working and giving, humorous and helpful, trusting. My deep respect and thanks go to all those people (Yawanawá and others) who opened their doors to me as a stranger in their home. It was privileged to be among them, albeit briefly.

Flooding at Yawanawa tribe

Floodwater-ravaged banks at Yawanawa tribal territory

Uwe has written some blog entries about his experiences at  http://mistakesandcontradictions.blogspot.co.uk.

Advertisements

The Dove of Peace at Cruise Terminal 1, Dover

Anthony Heywood’s sculpture, The  Dove of Peace, was unveiled at an event at Cruise Terminal 1, Dover on 22 December.  The Viscount De L’Isle MBE, Her Majesty’s Lord-Lieutenant of Kent, and Viscountess De L’Isle attended as guests of honour.

The installation of the sculpture, a full size spitfire made from a special type of paper developed at the former Buckland Paper Mill in Dover, is part of the Port of Dover’s commitment to commemorating both World War I and II.  The Cruise Terminal 1 building, which played a significant role as a staging post during both world wars for troops leaving to fight and returning home, is the location for the sculpture as well as future commemorative events through to 2018.

Anthony Heywood and Uwe Derksen worked on this idea for the last couple of years and, with the support of Dover Arts Development and part-funded bythe UCA’s research budget and the EU Interreg Channel programme, got the backing of Dover Harbour Board.

Reflecting on the occasion, Tim Waggott, Chief Executive, Port of Dover, said:

This wonderful event is a seminal moment for the Port, its commitment to its community and for the future use of such an historic building. This is the culmination of much work with a great many partners and is the launch pad for a new era for this place. Seeing so many members of our community come and be part of our shared story is simply wonderful.

UCA’s Anthony Heywood  said that the Dove of Peace “symbolises heroism, individualism and belief; it symbolises self-preservation, fear and the shattering of young lives.”  It can also be seen as a symbol of future conflicts yet to pass and of precious and fragile peace.  Reflecting both war and peace, the event played homage to the 1914 Christmas truce that took place in the trenches, and included

The Dove of Peace installed

The Dove of Peace installed

readings and carols.

More on the story at the Port of Dover website.

Lens student exchange – results!

Design development of the school building in Lens

Lens Student Exchange

Students on the Interior Architecture and Design course have completed their work on plans to transform old school buildings in Lens, France, into an enterprise centre. During a seven-month exchange scheme, part of the Recreate project, the students worked with furniture design students from the University d’Artois to present their proposals for the space.

Course Leader Peter Waters said:

A cross border project like this not only enables our students to experience a live brief, but it also encourages them to step away from their, perhaps, overly familiar surroundings to experience a similar but sufficiently different culture. They also have the opportunity to gain an understanding of the role that an interior designer can play in the regeneration process.

 

For more information please contact Amie at arai2@ucreative.ac.uk

A contemporary reading room

Inspired by Margate’s Georgian reading rooms and as part of an overall debate on the role of interior architecture on urban renewal, students on the Interior Architecture and Design (BA) Hons course worked with lecturers to design a modular reading room for the modern day.

Traditionally, reading rooms were a cross between a library, a museum of curiosities, and a place for games and gossip so students built into the reading room their own modules, places for reading, writing, playing games and chatting.

Initially installed at the old Pettman’s Depository, Resort Studios, Margate in November 2013 to host a week-long series of events and talks. During the summer of 2014, the Reading Room continued its legacy travelling to the Folkestone Triennial where it was housed at the Visitor Centre acting as a place for public forums as well as an information point for festival visitors. For more images go here.

Crysalis’ achievements

A strong fabric built over three years’ intense collaboration

The three-year Crysalis project is almost complete, and we are celebrating its many successes and its legacy. Industrial partners and entrepreneurs, students, designers, researchers and artists have been working across borders and have set up a new, strong network all about textiles.

We’ve created lots of opportunities; for knowledge transfer, which allowed textile professionals, as well as enthusiastic amateurs, to be inspired with new ideas and the necessary courage to leave the beaten paths. For creativity as a priority, too: experimental and creative session resulted time and time again in beautiful, smart or innovative textile products, which will perhaps appear commercially in the near future.

There were several exhibitions where the public was given a glimpse of a new future for textiles. In the UK, France and Belgium, we exceeded our visitor number expectations, attracting 63,183 visitors, illustrated in our interaction per activities reach map image (below left)

Interaction per activity

Interaction per activity

Besides the added value of Crysalis activities for the individual participants, there were opportunities created to continue the new collaborations and projects. Meetings between enthusiastic and expert people produced synergies that will, we believe, have promising results.

The collaborative weave we have been working on together is strong, but it isn’t finished yet. We want to explore the possibility of continuing to strengthen local textile techniques, for instance, by teaching skills and stimulating knowledge-sharing between European partners. Find out more about the interactions fostered by Crysalis in these three years of work in our interaction per region reach map at the foot of this page.

Of course, textile innovation is necessary to move forward, so we want to continue offering creative people like artists and designers opportunities to develop new applications. One way we are thinking of doing this is through making working areas more accessible via our edge services. More information at www.ucaedge.com

 

More information: Susiane at ssampaio@ucreative.ac.uk

 

 

 

 

 

Crysalis activity by region

Crysalis activity by region

A Sense of Place