Students’ hard work showcased in performances of Noye’s Fludde

DSC_0108Students from across UCA saw their hard work showcased in ACT’s collaborative performance of Noye’s Fludde by Benjamin Britten, in Picardy, France last month. This one-act opera, composed in 1957, has become a major collaborative piece, fuDSC_0401nded by ACT,  that has seen the involvement of students from UCA as well as Melbourne Village College, the Royal Opera House Learning and Participation and  Southend YMCA.

Many staff and students at UCA from a range of courses have taken part:

  • Computer Arts & Animation with Phil Gomm & graduates who were involved in the concept, research & designs for pop-up features such as kite, ark, moon, stars & sun.
  • Creative Arts for Theatre and Film with Chris Hunt, Colin Bean, Graduate Teaching Assistants and 4 dedicated students who were involved in the concept, design and fabrication of main character costumes.
  • Graphic Design: Visual Communication with Hugh Harwood & students who produced graphic images for marketing material in a competition & were involved in documenting the performances.
  • Broadcast Media: students are  involved in documenting the performances.
Scene from Noye's Fludde

Scene from Noye’s Fludde

Joy Golsbrough a student on Creative Arts for Theatre and Film student and costume designer for NF, said,

I thought the performance was beautiful, it was lovely seeing everything work together; the colourful rainbow set, seeing the children’s animal headdresses and LED lights, hearing the orchestra play and the actors sing.The Gossips looked fabulous and the costumes worked well with their characters. Although it wasn’t in the design, I liked the way they had incorporated belts around their waists and attached their shawls to their shoulders.   The patterns on their gowns worked really well and you could distinguish them from a distance. They were bright and colourful. They were better than I imagined them to be.The highlight of the trip for me was speaking to the actor who played Jaffeth, he was so happy with the costume that I had designed for him, and so were his parents. Being a part of a collaboration and working on a live brief was exciting. It meant the work you put in would actually pay off and be recognised by the public. Obviously it is great to add the work to a portfolio and CV. Working with ACT was valuable as it gave more experience outside of UCA and meant you could meet new people in the industry and have an idea of other people’s jobs. Going to France to see the performance and having a posh dinner out was a bonus as well.

 

Liam Hollingham, Graphic Design: Visual Communication student and poster designer for NF, said

Scene from Noye's Fludde

Scene from Noye’s Fludde

Through doing ACT project for the last year and a half and watching performances like the one that we did I must say that this performance was the most intimate out of the three; it gave a great feeling that you were made part of it. The highlight was the use of interaction and the combination of theatre and orchestra that moulded so well together .

It brought the theatre company together and really brought the characters alive.  I was amazed by everything that came out on stage as it was the first time that I had ever seen the costumes or anything that represented something in such a minimalistic approach.

I think anything more than a live brief like the ones I have worked on the past it make all what you are doing at uni become real in a sense; it builds contacts and understanding the world of work, as well. I learnt that working at uni is a place to learn skills that you can then use in these situations; these projects bring you in to the reality of the world of design work .

Chris Hunt, Course Leader for Creative Arts Theatre and Film, said

This was a great experience for students.  Working as designers on a professional, large-scale  production like this is something which students rarely get the chance to do, and the four costume designers involved – Keri Johnston, Joy Goldsborough, Fenella Barr and Steph Bolduc – really got their teeth into it.  They designed costumes which in essence are modern and colourful but which also resonate with past cultures and Biblical themes.   It was a real challenge for them to work on individual designs and then meet to adjust their designs so that the ensemble worked as a whole, and they managed this process of individual development and co-operation admirably well.

 

The show will be performed again in England on Thursday 5 and Friday 6 March at Cambridge at Melbourne Village College.

interreg logo

Advertisements

The enterprise of liberation

The Creative Challenge has kicked off with a bang this year, with a packed schedule of workshops in the UK and a residential in France for many students. There is a truly international flavour with students from ESADHaR as well as our own UCA students getting involved.

Both UCA and ESADHaR students submitted proposals this year; submissions were scored by external assessors and all successful students were offered an all-expenses paid place on the Residential Workshop held in Le Havre, France from Monday 24th to Friday 28th November. The trip to Le Havre was a great success, with forty-nine students from UCA and ESADHaR attending.

“Liberation” was the theme of the residential; student were grouped to focus on different aspects of liberation with the support of a facilitator and, for many groups, a previous Creative Challenge student. Each group was challenged to tackle their theme and to create a work to exhibit.

 

ICR was selected under the European Cross-border Cooperation Programme INTERREG IVA France (Channel) – England, co-funded by the ERDF

interreg logo

Creative Challenge Residential Nov 2014 gallery

interreg logo

A Colourful District

CREA-Zone cluster event

The Research + Enterprise Department is involved in the CREA- Zone cluster project which brings together partners from Belgium, France and the Netherlands all of whom are delivering Interreg funded projects.

The current economic crisis has driven regions and cities to find new ways to inject the economy with creativity and innovation. Through collaboration with creative and cultural industries, traditional industries can find ways to enhance their resilience in the face of increased economic, social and environmental challenges.

The Interreg projects have researched and experimented with concepts aimed at increasing the visibility of the economic value of the creative and cultural industries and this is the focus of The Colourful District event, taking place on the 5th and 6th of November. A digital publication summarising the findings and projects will be available at the end of November.

Interreg projects will be presented at the event, held in the Budafabriek, in Kortrijk, Belgium, where synergies between different projects will be pulled into focus and success stories will be shared with a broad audience.

The event programme is packed:

Wednesday 5 November – Budascoop/Budafabriek Kortrijk

6 p.m.                WELCOME AT BUDASCOOP, Kapucijnenstraat 10, Kortrijk (Belgium)

6:30 p.m.         WORD OF WELCOME: Franky Devos, director arts centre BUDA / Budafabriek

6:35 p.m.         CREA-Zone – international cluster for the promotion of the creative industry: Ellen Bisschops, project manager SPK Turnhout

 

6:45 p.m.         DAAN ROOSEGAARDE

In a world shifting between the analogue and the digital, Studio Roosegaarde is the social design lab of artist Daan Roosegaarde and his team of designers and engineers. The studio creates interactive designs that explore the dynamic relation between people, technology and space. The studio develops its own innovations and is internationally known for interactive projects such as Dune, Intimacy and Smart Highway.

Interview: Hilde Bouchez

7:30 p.m.         Short walk to the Budafabriek, Dam 2A, Kortrijk

From 7:30 p.m.           INSPIRING EXAMPLES FOR A COLOURED DISTRICT

The collaboration between designers, entrepreneurs, students, artists and active citizens leads to concrete results. At the imposing Budafabriek, good practice is presented by the University of the Creative Arts Canterbury, SPK Turnhout, Avans Hogeschool Breda, TIO3 Ronse, Pictanovo Tourcoing, Entrepreneurial Centers Mechelen and West Flanders, Flanders DC and Buda Kortrijk.

 

EXHIBIT – THE GREEN LIGHT DISTRICT

A green economy is an important issue for entrepreneurs, designers, scientists and artists alike. CREA-Zone selected international projects that transcend the sense of defeatism that tends to surround ecology and environmentalism:

The Green Light District presents work by Alberto Baraya (CO), Nick Ervinck (BE), Lucas Foglia (US), Brandon Ballengée (US), Annemie Maes (BE), David Bowen (US), Luc Deleu (BE), Maya Smrekar (SI), Peter De Cupere (BE), Bart Stolle (BE), Future Farmers (US), Nano Supermarket (NL), Honoré d’O (BE), Ralph Kim (UK), Mattia Casalegno (IT), Martin uit den Bogaard (NL), Koen Vanmechelen (BE), Eduardo Kac (US), Heath Bunting (UK).

In addition there is  scientific research by Howest, Kulak, Vives & Provinciale   Tuinbouwschool and entrepreneurial projects by Vasch Aquaponics, Deceuninck, Vanheede, Alpro, Drukta, Ocular, Devolder Architecten.

Curator: Christophe Dejaeger

Thursday 6 November – Budafabriek Kortrijk

9 a.m.              BREAKFAST MEETING – Croissants, coffee, creative entrepreneurs, politicians, policy advisors, students …all welcome!

10 a.m.           CREA-Zone – international cluster for the promotion of the creative industry: Ellen Bisschops, project manager SPK Turnhout

10:30 a.m.      STIMULATING ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS FOR THE CREATIVE INDUSTRY

Prof Annick Schramme is professor and academic coordinator of the master’s program Cultural Management at the University of Antwerp. In addition, she leads the Competence Center Creative Industries of the Flanders District of Creativity at the Antwerp Management School.

11 a.m.                        3 INSPIRING EXAMPLES FOR A COLOURFUL DISTRICT

  • Made or Cartamundi / SPK Turnhout
  • Incunables / Pictanovo Tourcoing
  • Results of the temporary stay of the students from Thomas More Mechelen @ Buda

 

11:30 a.m.       THE INNOVATIVE CONTRIBUTION OF EUROPE’S CREATIVE INDUSTRY TO THE WIDER ECONOMY: TOWARDS A NEW POLICY AGENDA

Johanna Van Antwerpen is the founder of the Amsterdam Innovation Motor (AIM). AIM is the innovation agency of the Amsterdam Metropolitan Area which merged, with other organisations, into the Amsterdam Economic Board in 2013. AIM has been set up to help preserve and strengthen Amsterdam’s key position in the knowledge-based economy. The Amsterdam Economic Board promotes innovation, cooperation and new activities in relevant economic sectors such as; creative Industries, ICT, Life Sciences, Sustainability, Financial and Business services.

noon                3 INSPIRING EXAMPLES FOR A COLOURFUL DISTRICT

  • GaIl Baxter or Neil / University of Creative Arts Canterbury
  • The Smell Project / Avans Hogeschool Breda
  • Buda::Lab / Buda Kortrijk

 

12:30 p.m.       CONCLUSIONS FROM THE CREA-Zone CLUSTER

Ellen Bisschops, project manager SPK Turnhout

 

For more information contact Susiane at ssampaio@ucreative.ac.uk

Lens student exchange – results!

Design development of the school building in Lens

Lens Student Exchange

Students on the Interior Architecture and Design course have completed their work on plans to transform old school buildings in Lens, France, into an enterprise centre. During a seven-month exchange scheme, part of the Recreate project, the students worked with furniture design students from the University d’Artois to present their proposals for the space.

Course Leader Peter Waters said:

A cross border project like this not only enables our students to experience a live brief, but it also encourages them to step away from their, perhaps, overly familiar surroundings to experience a similar but sufficiently different culture. They also have the opportunity to gain an understanding of the role that an interior designer can play in the regeneration process.

 

For more information please contact Amie at arai2@ucreative.ac.uk

A contemporary reading room

Inspired by Margate’s Georgian reading rooms and as part of an overall debate on the role of interior architecture on urban renewal, students on the Interior Architecture and Design (BA) Hons course worked with lecturers to design a modular reading room for the modern day.

Traditionally, reading rooms were a cross between a library, a museum of curiosities, and a place for games and gossip so students built into the reading room their own modules, places for reading, writing, playing games and chatting.

Initially installed at the old Pettman’s Depository, Resort Studios, Margate in November 2013 to host a week-long series of events and talks. During the summer of 2014, the Reading Room continued its legacy travelling to the Folkestone Triennial where it was housed at the Visitor Centre acting as a place for public forums as well as an information point for festival visitors. For more images go here.

Crysalis’ achievements

A strong fabric built over three years’ intense collaboration

The three-year Crysalis project is almost complete, and we are celebrating its many successes and its legacy. Industrial partners and entrepreneurs, students, designers, researchers and artists have been working across borders and have set up a new, strong network all about textiles.

We’ve created lots of opportunities; for knowledge transfer, which allowed textile professionals, as well as enthusiastic amateurs, to be inspired with new ideas and the necessary courage to leave the beaten paths. For creativity as a priority, too: experimental and creative session resulted time and time again in beautiful, smart or innovative textile products, which will perhaps appear commercially in the near future.

There were several exhibitions where the public was given a glimpse of a new future for textiles. In the UK, France and Belgium, we exceeded our visitor number expectations, attracting 63,183 visitors, illustrated in our interaction per activities reach map image (below left)

Interaction per activity

Interaction per activity

Besides the added value of Crysalis activities for the individual participants, there were opportunities created to continue the new collaborations and projects. Meetings between enthusiastic and expert people produced synergies that will, we believe, have promising results.

The collaborative weave we have been working on together is strong, but it isn’t finished yet. We want to explore the possibility of continuing to strengthen local textile techniques, for instance, by teaching skills and stimulating knowledge-sharing between European partners. Find out more about the interactions fostered by Crysalis in these three years of work in our interaction per region reach map at the foot of this page.

Of course, textile innovation is necessary to move forward, so we want to continue offering creative people like artists and designers opportunities to develop new applications. One way we are thinking of doing this is through making working areas more accessible via our edge services. More information at www.ucaedge.com

 

More information: Susiane at ssampaio@ucreative.ac.uk

 

 

 

 

 

Crysalis activity by region

Crysalis activity by region